The Girl Is A Ghost

Formed in Lawrence, KS in 2005.

Radio station: Listen to music by Girl Is A Ghost

Upcoming shows

No scheduled events.

Past shows

Description

Current Status: Despite unreasonable fears of flying, constant interaction, an awkward sleeping arrangement, a comically slow and painful tumble down a flight of stairs, and the bands inability to transfer trains, The Girl is a Ghost has safely returned home from Oakland, California, successfully recording their first release for Baria Records. The record was produced by Ted Nesseth of The Heavenly States and engineered by Wally of WallySound. The songs will now be mixed, mastered and released in early 2006. Plans for touring are in progress, and should actually be realized this time around.

Similar to: Beatles, Pixies, Kinks, Elvis Costello, weird '50s bands

Genre

Rock

History

It was all supposed to be a joke. Driven by promises of money for nothing, airplanes and golden earrings, four Kansas City metro area scallawags formed pop ensemble The Girl is a Ghost on Labor Day 2002, then sat back and waited for their new life, devoid of manual toil, to begin. Three years later, the joke is on the band, as they continue to be saddled with the responsibilities of appeasing the maniacal whims of Eugene, the sinister mastermind of Baria Records (a sprawling melodic conspiracy with key players like Cloud Cult, the Heavenly States, the Lovemakers, and our heroes themselves), and hawking their debut EP, Summering, while preparing for the release of their first full-length on Baria. But just like the working class of the Dust Bowl persevered to the tune of Gutherie and the '89 Colts rallied to the sweet sounds of Mellencamp, The Girl is a Ghost struggle onward, inspired by the Beatles, Kinks, Pixies and "weird 50s bands" whose identities the band refuses to reveal. Is that a factory whistle - or simply a grinding farfisa topped with a manic guitar and a gritty pop croon? Diligent steel rendering - or a metronome-steady drum and bass rhythm section? Only the Department of Labor - or perhaps the most discerning of pop connoisseurs - can say for certain.