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No more 'Tears' for Clapton

New York -- Two of Eric Clapton's best-known songs are gone from his concert repertoire -- perhaps for good.

The guitar legend found, during a series of concerts in Japan a few months ago, that he couldn't perform "Tears in Heaven" and "My Father's Eyes."

The songs, both Grammy Award winners, deal with the loss of his 4-year-old son, Conor, who died when he fell from a New York apartment in 1991.

"I didn't feel the loss anymore, which is so much a part of performing those songs," he said.

"I really have to connect with the feelings that were there when I wrote them," he said. "They're kind of gone and I really don't want them to come back, particularly. My life is a different life now."

Bigger things to worry about

New York -- For 'N Sync's JC Chasez, there are more important things going on in the world than worrying about decency standards on TV.

Responding to the outcry after pop star Janet Jackson's infamous breast-baring at the Super Bowl halftime show, a performance that also included his 'N Sync bandmate Justin Timberlake, "I think it's hilarious that things are the way they are," Chasez told Newsweek for the issue out on newsstands Monday. "We're about to elect the leader of our country. We don't have enough money for schools, we're at war and we're worried about this?

"We all think about sex and love ... People gravitate to the sex songs more. Surprise, surprise."

Heeere's help from Johnny

Red Oak, Iowa -- Johnny Carson is giving a hand, and a hefty donation, to a performing arts center in southwest Iowa.

Carson, who retired from NBC's "Tonight Show" in 1992 after 29 years, was born in Corning, also in southwest Iowa, and grew up in Norfolk, Neb.

The proposed arts center in Red Oak will provide entertainment and performance arts educational opportunities to the region, with emphasis on dance, theater arts and music.

Plans include a 250-seat theater, rehearsal room, classrooms, a production facility and dance studio.

The amount of Carson's donation was not disclosed.

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