Arts notes

Bending the laws of art galleries

The recently opened Douglas County Law Library wants to give area artists another venue to show their work.

The library is seeking mostly two-dimensional work, although there will be limited room for three-dimensional pieces, librarian Kerry Altenbernd says. Bodies of work by individual artists are preferred, but occasional shows by multiple artists might be organized. The library will not take commissions on works that sell.

Artists interested in showing work at the library should contact exhibition coordinator Bill Pendleton at 843-3536 or billpen@sunflower.com.

The library, open 24 hours to Douglas County attorneys and limited hours to the public (noon-3 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday), is on the main level of the Judicial and Law Enforcement Building, 111 E. 11th St.

Kansas University Organist takes second in national competition

Jared Ostermann, a Kansas University sophomore in organ performance from Lawrence, won the $2,000 second prize at the fourth annual Augustana Arts/Reuter National Undergraduate Organ Competition.

The three-day contest, at Augustana Lutheran Church in Denver, offered more than $8,000 in prizes provided by Reuter Organ Co. of Lawrence with promotional assistance from the Denver chapter of the American Guild of Organists.

Ostermann, who was home schooled, is the son of Charlotte and Russell Ostermann. He has studied with Michael Bauer, KU professor of organ and church music, for the past three years and is assistant organist at St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center at KU.

Objects in view may be different than they appear

A temporary exhibition at Signs of Life gallery will test viewers' understanding of their vision.

Kansas University students in the second-year architecture class of Zuzanna Karczewska have designed devices that make humans aware of the act of looking. Eleven contraptions were designed, and nine of them will be on view Thursday through Saturday at the gallery, 722 Mass.

"To Be Viewed from 5 Feet With One Eye," above, by Lawren Jaccaud, Cassandra Leyden and Ashley White explores the fragility of seeing because it's based on a single point of view.

Karczewska will give a gallery talk at 5 p.m. Saturday.

Scottish fiddler brings Highland taste to Lied

Bonnie Rideout, one of the finest and most fiery Scottish fiddlers, will get even rowdier when the World Champion City of Washington Pipe Band joins her and her trio at the Lied Center.

The concert will be 7:30 p.m. Friday.

The trio, which includes Bryan Aspey on guitar and Matthew Bell on percussion, plays traditional Scottish dance tunes, Highland bagpipe music and ancient Gaelic melodies. The Washington pipers and drummers perform in full regalia, and their collaboration with the trio will feature jigs, reels, hornpipes and marches.

Tickets are $11.50 to $28 and can be purchased by calling 864-2787.

Self-reflection turns into art for Tara Tonsor

Artist and recent Kansas University graduate Tara Nicole Tonsor has an obsession.

She's constantly trying to document her experiences and thoughts, and her artwork reflects these captured "moments" with all their revelations and frustrations.

Large paintings, a visual timeline and diary and a series of brightly painted wooden plaques with collage by Tonsor will be on view Saturday through April 28 at Olive Gallery and Art Supply.

An opening for the exhibition, titled "See{k}," will be from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at the gallery, 15 E. Eighth St. Drawings by Sarah Anne Bradshaw will be on display in the gallery's Kids Corner during the show.

KU organist places second in national competition

Jared Ostermann, a Kansas University sophomore in organ performance from Lawrence, won the $2,000 second prize at the fourth annual Augustana Arts/Reuter National Undergraduate Organ Competition.

The three-day contest, at Augustana Lutheran Church in Denver, offered more than $8,000 in prizes provided by Reuter Organ Co. of Lawrence with promotional assistance from the Denver chapter of the American Guild of Organists.

Ostermann was one of four student organists who were selected from among 18 entrants who submitted tapes or CDs and were flown to Denver for the March 12-14 event.

Ostermann, who was home schooled, is the son of Charlotte and Russell Ostermann. He has studied with Michael Bauer, KU professor of organ and church music, for the past three years and is assistant organist at St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center at KU.

Exhibit offers rare glimpse at Kansas-Nebraska Act

Topeka -- The Kansas-Nebraska Act, which created Kansas Territory, will be on display in an exhibition opening Saturday at the Kansas State Museum of History in Topeka.

"Willing to Die for Freedom: A Look Back at Kansas Territory" commemorates the 150th anniversary of the territorial period in Kansas and will be on display through October. But the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which has never before been exhibited outside the Washington, D.C. area, will only be on view through June. The National Archives considers the act to be among the top 100 documents that shaped America.

Among the other collections featured in the exhibit are John Brown artifacts, including a desk, dagger and pike; a shackle cut from the leg of an escaped slave; and the actual Kansas constitution.

Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and $2 for students. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

Eclectic singer-songwriter brings show to Lawrence

Singer-songwriter Cheryl Wheeler, known for making audiences cry with her tender songs one moment and then laugh at her humor the next, will play at 8 p.m. Friday in Lawrence.

Pianist and singer-songwriter Kenny White will open for and accompany Wheeler during the concert, which will be at Woodruff Auditorium in the Kansas Union, 1301 Jayhawk Blvd.

Wheeler's songs explore loneliness, restlessness and relationship difficulties. She also sings commentaries such as "If It Were Up To Me," in which she catalogs the reasons given for school shootings but concludes, "If it were up to me, I'd take away the guns."

Tickets are $18 for adults or $16 with a KUID. For more information, call 864-7469 or visit www.westsidefolk.org.

Celebrated poet to visit Rockhurst University

Kansas City, Mo. -- Albert Goldbarth, author of more than 20 poetry collections, will read from his works at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Rockhurst University's Mabee Theater.

Goldbarth is distinguished professor of humanities at Wichita State University. He is the only poet to win the Book Critics Circle Award for poetry twice. He won the award for both his 2001 collection, "Saving Lives: Poems," and his latest book, "Combinations of the Universe."

His appearance is part of the Midwest Poets Series, sponsored by the Rockhurst University Center for the Arts and Letters.

Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for students and seniors. For more information, call (816) 501-4607.

Open Call Dance Company offers class in Eudora

Open Call Dance Company and the Eudora Parks and Recreation Department have partnered to organize a dance program for Girl Scouts.

The program includes two one-day sessions of dance classes and dance history lessons. Classes cover jazz, ballet, modern and creative movement. Participants will be able to earn a dance badge.

The first session is 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday at the old middle school in Eudora, A "show off" for family and friends will be at 3 p.m. Students should wear comfortable clothes and bring a lunch.

Troops can sign up together or individuals may register on their own. Cost is $20 per student, $15 for troops of 10 or more.

Another one-day session will be April 24. The program also offers a month-long session April 22-May 20 at Eudora's old middle school. Participants may attend Thursday classes from 4 p.m.-5 p.m. or 7 p.m.-8 p.m. This session will culminate with a performance at 3 p.m. May 23. Cost is $35 per student, $30 for troops of 10 or more.

For information, call Jessica Vogt at (913) 302-3046.

Follow the yellow brick road

The grand opening of Kansas' only "Wizard of Oz" museum will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday in Wamego. The museum contains one of the largest permanent exhibits of Oz memorabilia -- more than 2,000 pieces -- in the United States.

Tod Machin, a Wamego native and 1985 Kansas State University graduate, amassed the impressive collection. He now lives in Kansas City and is a recognized authority on the ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the 1939 MGM movie.

Saturday's event will feature appearances by two of only a handful of living stars from the movie. Margaret Pelligrini, one of the original sleepyhead munchkins, and Clarence Swensen, a munchkin soldier, will be present, as well as Roger S. Baum, grandson of L. Frank Baum.

The museum, at 511 Lincoln St. in Wamego, will be open to the public beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday. It will remain open for an hour after the opening festivities conclude.

For information, call (785) 458-8686.

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