Pomeroy is (L to R) David Fairbanks, Matt Marron, Chris Davis, Tyson Leslie, Dean Hopkins.

Pomeroy is (L to R) David Fairbanks, Matt Marron, Chris Davis, Tyson Leslie, Dean Hopkins.

Way back in the late '90s, when Napster and Y2K were in fashion, a merry band of metalheads united in conquest of fame and fortune-or maybe just fun. They called themselves Pomeroy (not to be confused with the consulting group or college-basketball ratings) and developed a slick sound incorporating funk, hip-hop and rock influences. They moved from Manhattan to Lawrence and then to Omaha building a grassroots following that dotted the plains. A connection with Armed Forces Entertainment sent them in a different direction: The Middle East, where they funked up U.S. military bases. Then the five-piece group went back to the proverbial drawing board and cooked up "A New Reflection." The album marks a new chapter in the Pomeroy scrapbook-one that guitarist Matt Marron and singer David Fairbanks divulged in our half-hour podcast with the band.

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Way back in the late '90s, when Napster and Y2K were in fashion, a merry band of metalheads united in conquest of fame and fortune-or maybe just fun. They called themselves Pomeroy (not to be confused with the consulting group or college-basketball ratings) and developed a slick sound incorporating funk, ...

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lawrence.com: So what album is this?

David: It's the fourth music album, but we put out a DVD/CD combo, so I guess it's the fifth.

Matt: This new record is quite different than anything we've done. We used to do a funk/hip-hop kind of thing and have been known for that. This record is a lot more rock, a lot more singing, a lot more melodic. We just kind of decided that we weren't going to be scared of supplying the rock.

David: Both fists of it:

Matt: But it still sounds like Pomeroy. It still has a groove to it.

David: It's probably more of a complete thought. It's something we're really behind and it's kind of the natural evolution of where we were going. It's something to behold.

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A New Reflection

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Have you found that your fans have stuck with you or have you had to start from scratch a little bit?

David: We've got a really loyal fan base : That's what's really kept it going for us. Every band says, "Oh, we have the best fans in the world," but our fans really go the extra mile for us and always show up and always love what we do. At the same time, they critique us and give us their honest opinion. We've been getting some negative feedback on this album from people who have been there since the first album. We really like hearing that, because that means somebody cares.

Matt: They're hearing this new stuff and they're going, "OK man, where's the 311 stuff? Where's the funk?"

David: "Where's the pseudo-rap-rock 1999 Pomeroy?" : With change comes a little bit of friction, but I think it's for the best and I think everybody will realize that.

When you listen to 1999 Pomeroy, what do you think?

Matt: We just don't.

David: It's not that we hate it : There's a place in our heart for all of it. But you ask any guy in a band-the second you're done with something, you want to move on to the next thing. We've never spent a lot of time dwelling on the past. It's not like you get into my car and I've got "Cocoon Club" in my CD player just bumpin' it.

Past Event

Pomeroy

  • Thursday, October 18, 2007, 8 p.m.
  • Granada, 1020 Mass., Lawrence
  • All ages / $10

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Matt: There's also this sense of being a little bit older and starting to realize that we have some accountability. We realize we're onstage saying things in front of hundreds of people, and now we have our fans' kids coming out to shows. I think it all hit me a couple years ago when we were doing a show in Omaha and these girls came up onstage who were probably five or six years old. They started singing lyrics to a song called "Summer Night," which was a song that we wrote in college about going out, getting wasted and having fun. It was just like, "Wow, this is a little scary and maybe inappropriate." A lot of the lyrics on the new record are more uplifting and have more positive messages.

David: At the same time, we're not going to be that band that never plays anything old. We're going to give people what they want to hear.

Where did you make this record?

David: 53rd Street Studios in Fairway, Kansas, with our superstar producer Matthew Russo. He had a lot to do with the success of this album.

Matt: This was the first time we really let a producer get into all aspects of our music-lyrics, music, everything.

David: We didn't let him write any of our stuff, but he works with us very well and he's good to bounce ideas off of.

Matt: There were a few times where he came in and was like, "Man, I'm reading these lyrics and the music doesn't match the mood of what you're trying to say." Then he'll have a musical idea: "I think we should really bring down the verse and just chill out, because what you're saying is some serious stuff."

What are your plans for the upcoming months?

Matt: Midwest domination.

David: We're basically gone for the next six weeks.

Matt: And we get to tour in a bus for the first time.

David: We figure after 10 years we owe it to ourselves to get a bus. We're excited. We all got bunks to sleep in and we can't stress enough how awesome it's going to be to get out of that damn van.

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