Cloudy with a Chance of Dance Party

Cloud Dog makes ecstatic sounds for loose-limbed listeners

Cloud Dog is (L to R): Curt Yazza, Jim Dandy, and Brett Grady.

Cloud Dog is (L to R): Curt Yazza, Jim Dandy, and Brett Grady.

Podcast episode

The Dog and Pony Show

Cloudy with a Chance of Dance Party: An interview with Cloud Dog

Cloud Dog is a kindred spirit to freaked-out experimental acts like Dan Deacon, Animal Collective, and F*ck Buttons, building songs out of jarring sample juxtapositions and loopy beats. The insanity is held together by addictive rhythms that invite dancing and/or beating on the nearest non-living thing. The three active Cloud ...

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The setup for a Cloud Dog show typically consists of a giant bass drum, some floor toms, cymbals, samplers, keyboards, and assorted percussion devices. Ringleader Jim Dandy and accomplices including Brett Grady and Curt Yazza – often shirtless and smeared in body paint – stir up a primitive ruckus straight from an alternate dimension, possibly one under the influence of heavy hallucinogens.

The group is a kindred spirit to freaked-out experimental acts like Dan Deacon, Animal Collective, and F*ck Buttons, building songs out of jarring sample juxtapositions and loopy beats. The insanity is held together by addictive rhythms that invite dancing and/or beating on the nearest non-living thing (or living, if he/she is into that sort of thing). Bring a drum and some war paint and you can hop onstage and get in on the action — there are no boundaries at a Cloud Dog show.

The three active Cloud Doggers popped into our podcast studio to chat and share tracks from their recent albums “Animals” and “Black Night White Light.” They’ll perform Thursday at the Eighth Street Taproom and Friday at the Bottleneck.

Comments

mayanspacecadet 12 years, 1 month ago

The music sounds cool, but i quit listening after the guy refused to translate what he said in Navajo. Ohhhh, you're so hip and cutting edge and strident! What, do you expect everyone to go learn a nearly dead language -- that a fraction of a percentage of people know -- in order to know what a local music band member said in a podcast?

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